At Glebe Farm we are proposing to bring forward a mix of new housing, a community orchard and play areas for children; combined with the introduction of new ponds and waterbodies, new tree planting and enhanced biodiversity opportunities.

Horsham District Council’s Cabinet has endorsed the site as a draft allocation for at least 240 new homes in their emerging new Local Plan.

At Glebe Farm we are proposing to bring forward a mix of new housing, a community orchard and play areas for children; combined with the introduction of new ponds and waterbodies, new tree planting and enhanced biodiversity opportunities.

Horsham District Council’s Cabinet has endorsed the site as a draft allocation for at least 240 new homes in their emerging new Local Plan.

Founded in 2003, Richborough Estates promotes land through the planning system to deliver new development for local communities. Our current schemes include housing, employment, retail and community/leisure facilities such as health, allotments/orchards and public open spaces. We work in partnership with landowners, the local community, councils and stakeholders to secure planning permission on suitable sites; following which we appoint a build partner.

The landowners we work with include private individuals, companies, charities, trusts and estate departments of public sector bodies, including councils. The sites we promote range in size but typically range from 150 to 300 homes. We believe our collaborative approach of working with stakeholders brings benefits to many of the main parties involved including the local community. Local planning authorities can rely on our technical expertise and experience to demonstrate how our sites are deliverable and meet planning policy aspirations and provide local benefits.

We currently have around 100 active projects across the country and if all of these sites come forward they would contribute around 25,000 homes and would play a significant role in ensuring a continued supply of new housing across England and Wales. Such a supply is particularly important in areas where house prices are high, especially for first-time buyers and those who require affordable accommodation because market housing costs are beyond their reach.

The Project Team

Richborough Estates have put together an experienced professional team to take forward our proposals for Glebe Farm as follows:

The site is located immediately to the north and east of the characterful town of Steyning.

The centre of Steyning, located to the west, is formed of the historic core of the town with an array of buildings dating back to the 18th Century or earlier and falls within the Steyning Conservation Area.

Residential development around this area grew at pace during the 1930’s and at a faster rate over post-war years. Residential development immediately to the west and south of the site is an example of this expansion.

Steyning Railway station, situated on the Horsham to Shoreham-by-Sea line, closed in 1966 with the alignment of the railway around the town now forming the A283 Steyning Bypass. By the early 21st Century the historic core of the town was entirely surrounded by residential development with future expansion to the south and west now limited by the designation of the South Downs National Park in 2011.

Countryside lies beyond the northern and eastern site boundaries which is defined by the District Council’s Landscape Character Assessment as having a gently undulating landform made up of a mix of small, medium and large pasture and arable fields.

The site comprises approximately 14 Hectares (34.59 Acres) of farmland which falls within the ownership of Glebe Farm. It is currently used as paddocks for grazing.

The southern and eastern boundaries of the site border Kings Barn Lane, which is an established residential area that comprises the existing Built Up Area Boundary of Steyning.

Steyning Bypass (A283) flanks the western edge of the site and its northern edge adjoins land owned by South Eastern Power Networks and South Eastern Limited.

A public right of way (No. 2585) crosses the northern area of the site, providing access to countryside situated to the north & east and Steyning High Street to the west. The Downs Link (National Cycle Network route 223) runs along Kings Barn Lane on the eastern boundary of the site.

Kings Barn Old Cottages, is a Grade II listed building situated opposite the eastern corner of the site on Kings Barn Lane. Steyning Conservation Area is situated to the west and is separated from the site by Steyning Bypass and housing.

Land situated beyond King’s Barn Lane to the east is a designated Site of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCI). This area also falls within the River Adur flood zone.

The vision for the site is to provide a new living environment to the highest standard, delivering an attractive, locally distinguishable addition to Steyning. Our proposals include:

  • New market and affordable homes
  • Over 11 acres (4.5 Hectares) of new public open space, including an equipped play area, natural play spaces, a community orchard and links to the existing public right of way network;
  • A new roundabout junction on the Steyning Bypass to access the development, with upgraded pedestrian crossing for the existing public right of way;
  • Creation of wetland habitats incorporating sustainable drainage.

The proposed masterplan shows how development could be laid out, however, this is illustrative and the detail would be progressed and considered through Reserved Matters planning application(s).

The design of the illustrative masterplan has been informed by the context of the site and in particular the landscape. The historic field boundaries have been retained and enhanced to form greenways that run through the site. These are complemented by additional green vistas that follow views of the South Downs, and St Andrews & St Cuthmans Church. Together, these generous swaths of open space create a network of landscaped corridors for pedestrians and cyclists, promoting sustainable travel and improving connectivity with the wider context.

The character of Steyning has been thoughtfully considered in the proposals, with care taken to ensure the unique identity of the surrounding context is demonstrated in the layout. Four distinct character areas are proposed that reflect and respond to their surroundings. These are as follows:

  • Principal Street: Taking design cues from the historic core of Steyning;
  • Railway Suburb: Referencing the old railway line that is now the Steyning bypass, and taking design cues from Station Road and Southdown Terrace;
  • Roman Road: Following the street patterns and urban form of the context south of the site; and
  • Springline Village: A lower density, more rural approach, in keeping with local villages.

The Development Plan

The current statutory development plan includes the Horsham District Planning Framework (HDPF) which was adopted in November 2015.

The current statutory development plan includes the Horsham District Planning Framework (HDPF) which was adopted in November 2015.

The HDPF includes a “development hierarchy” which ranks settlements in the District based on their ability and appropriateness to accommodate growth. Steyning is identified under the category of a ‘small town and larger village’, which is the second tier of the hierarchy with only Horsham itself above it.

Small towns and larger villages are defined as:
‘Settlements with a good range of services and facilities, strong community networks and local employment provision, together with reasonable rail and / or bus services. The settlements act as hubs for smaller villages to meet their daily needs, but also have some reliance on larger settlements/each other meet some of their requirements’

Horsham District Council are currently in the process of replacing the HDPF through the Local Plan Review (LPR) 2019-2036. The latest draft of the LPR was consulted upon by the District Council in February and March 2020. The LPR continues the approach established in the HDPF of identifying a development hierarchy of settlements and, again, Steyning continues to be identified within the second tier of “small town and larger village”.

The February 2020 draft of the LPR uses, as a starting point, the Government’s Standard Method for assessing Housing Need which was 965 dwellings per annum. This is equivalent to providing a minimum of 17,370 homes in the period between 2019 and 2036. In addition, the Local Plan must consider whether it can assist in meeting unmet need in adjoining authorities.

It is therefore clear that the Plan will need to provide for a significant amount of new homes and that, in light of its position in the development hierarchy, Steyning will be the focus of some of this development. On 15th July this year, the District Council’s Cabinet considered a report on the next stages of the LPR. This report included recommendations by Planning Officers as to which sites are considered to be suitable for development including, amongst others, Land at Glebe Farm which has been identified for 240 dwellings.

Steyning Neighbourhood Plan

The Steyning Neighbourhood Plan (SNP) has reached an advanced stage having been subject to a Regulation 16 Consultation in the Summer of 2020. The SNP sets out the local communities’ aspirations and vision for the Parish to 2031 including:

The Steyning Neighbourhood Plan (SNP) has reached an advanced stage having been subject to a Regulation 16 Consultation in the Summer of 2020. The SNP sets out the local communities’ aspirations and vision for the Parish to 2031 including:

Ensuring that the Parish continues to be an attractive place to live, learn, work and visit;

Having a vibrant and prosperous High Street providing both everyday goods and services as well as offering a variety of shopping and dining outlets;

Having housing that meets the needs and aspirations of the local community, that is well designed, promotes environmental efficiency and takes account of the demand on infrastructure. This includes the provision of sufficient affordable housing, particularly for key workers;

Have a vibrant economy with innovative new employment opportunities complementing existing work opportunities;

Having a network of well-maintained and safe roads and supported by bridleways, cycle routes and footpaths suitable for all non-motorised users. The Parish will also benefit from improved transport links and more frequent and better-connected bus services will provide greater opportunities for contact with neighbouring towns and villages, both coastal and inland, and reduce reliance on cars.

" Planning policies and decisions should ensure that developments are visually attractive as a result of good architecture, layout and appropriate and effective landscaping. "

" Planning policies and decisions should ensure that developments are visually attractive as a result of good architecture, layout and appropriate and effective landscaping. "

— Para 127(b) NPPF 2019
— Para 127(b) NPPF 2019

" Planning policies and decisions should ensure that developments establish or maintain a strong sense of place, using the arrangement of streets, spaces, building types and materials to create attractive, welcoming and distinctive places to live, work and visit. "

" Planning policies and decisions should ensure that developments establish or maintain a strong sense of place, using the arrangement of streets, spaces, building types and materials to create attractive, welcoming and distinctive places to live, work and visit. "

Para 127(d) NPPF 2019
Para 127(d) NPPF 2019
Utilities

The site is well placed to connect into existing services and utilities. Electricity, gas and water supply is available within the local vicinity and the area benefits from fibre broadband availability with speed up to 80mbps, creating opportunity for increased home working. initial enquiries with utility companies have identified no issues that would preclude the site from being developed for housing purposes, with no capacity issues anticipated in serving the development due to the extensive infrastructure networks in close proximity.

The site is well placed to connect into existing services and utilities. Electricity, gas and water supply is available within the local vicinity and the area benefits from fibre broadband availability with speed up to 80mbps, creating opportunity for increased home working. initial enquiries with utility companies have identified no issues that would preclude the site from being developed for housing purposes, with no capacity issues anticipated in serving the development due to the extensive infrastructure networks in close proximity.

Air Quality

In designing the scheme we have considered air quality, both in terms of construction and when people are living there. We have looked at any possible impacts the development could have on the existing situation and whether there would be any issues for new residents from traffic travelling along the by-pass. As part of this we have identified a number of sensitive receptors i.e. properties/locations which may be affected by changes in air quality as a result of a development.

In designing the scheme we have considered air quality, both in terms of construction and when people are living there. We have looked at any possible impacts the development could have on the existing situation and whether there would be any issues for new residents from traffic travelling along the by-pass. As part of this we have identified a number of sensitive receptors i.e. properties/locations which may be affected by changes in air quality as a result of a development.

For the construction phase, any potential impacts have been assessed using the Institute of Air Quality Management methodology and best practice dust control measures will be implemented via a construction management plan. Such measures can include using water to supress dust blowing about, re-vegetating temporary soil stockpiles to prevent wind whipping up soil, imposing a 10 mph limit on unsurfaced site roads, avoiding bonfires and burning of waste materials, ensuring sand and other aggregates are stored in bunded areas, use of wheel washing facilities and use of road sweepers on local roads. The assessment found that with good practice dust control measures in place, the impact from dust generation during construction would be ‘non significant’.

In respect of the occupation of the development, modelling has been undertaken in order to predict pollutant concentrations across the site and to predict impacts as a result of additional road vehicle exhaust emissions. We have verified our modelling using local monitoring results provided by Horsham District Council. The projected modelling at the estimated post site completion date of 2027 indicates that the impact on pollutant levels across all receptors tested in the vicinity of the site would be negligible, falling below the relevant air quality objectives at proposed sensitive locations.

Whilst the assessment found that air quality is not a concern, the proposals will include measures to reduce the carbon footprint of new homes as well as providing electric vehicle charging opportunities to increase off-site benefits.

Richborough Estates has appointed Planning Consultants, Blue Fox, who are available to assist in answering queries or providing help with access to information. Please let us know your thoughts about our proposals for Glebe Farm. You can complete the survey or leave your comments via the contact form below. Closing date for comments is the 4th August 2021.





    Richborough Estates has appointed Planning Consultants, Blue Fox, who are available to assist in answering queries or providing help with access to information. Please let us know your thoughts about our proposals for Glebe Farm. You can complete the survey or leave your comments via the contact form below. Closing date for comments is the 4th August 2021.